The importance of patience in the recruiting process and how hurrying can hurt your chances

The importance of patience in the recruiting processI recently had a chance to speak with an athlete about how the recruiting process went for him.  This player ended up being recruited by schools throughout the country but was not the first in-state player is his class to get an offer.  When talking to him about the scholarships, the recruit mentioned something about how he had waited so long for an offer and it finally came.  The problem with what this recruit said is that he was offered during February of his junior year.

The majority of recruits in all sports do not get offered until much later in their junior year.  The ones looking at the lower Division I/Division II levels usually don’t get scholarships until their senior seasons.  And while it is not fun to have to wait your turn, patience is something that is extremely necessary during the recruiting process.

Unless you are a sure fire Division I recruit, then you will likely have to wait and take your time when picking a college.  The reason why you have to take your time is simply because if you don’t have any scholarship offers, then chances are strong that you won’t be committing to a school unless they offer.  It may not be fun but it is a reality.

What that means is you need to get used to the coach speak where they tell you to keep working hard, be patient, and we will continue evaluating you.  What does that really mean?  It means make sure that you develop enough to be among our top recruits that get an offer or hope that all of those top recruits fall through and you may get a scholarship.  Also, make sure to give us a good chunk of money by attending all of our days of camp this summer.  The more time you are there, the more you will be evaluated.

If you are being recruited by a Division I school right now during the football recruiting process and have made Junior Day visits and they are showing a lot of interest but no scholarship offer is on the table, the earliest that scholarship will be extended is at their summer camp.  It it doesn’t come then, they are likely waiting on other prospects who they consider higher rated at this point to make a decision.  If they don’t pick that school, then an offer may come your way.

So unless you either have a scholarship right now or dazzle the coaches at their summer camp, you will basically be waiting until the fall to get any type of offers.  For most recruits out there, that is honestly just the way it is.  And if you have patience with your time, even with how stressing it is, it is going to be much easier.

Let’s say your family is getting impatient and wondering where exactly your scholarship offers are (this happens ALL THE TIME by the way).  Without patience, a father or mother may burn the bridges with a college coach.  The coach will tell them that they are still evaluating their football recruit of a son and the family wants an offer now.  If the coach considers your parents high maintenance, then they might cut all ties with the recruit.  Considering you were not a first priority in the early evaluations, that could easily happen.

There really is no reason to put undue stress on yourself.  If you are good enough to play at the Division I level and have been following the advice given by this site, then you will get your opportunity.  The same goes for Division II and III levels.  Athletes may think they are better than they really are and that is a big part of the evaluation process.

So take your time with the recruiting process.  Just because you sent college coaches your recruiting profile and video doesn’t mean an offer is on the way.  They are likely going to take some time, learn more about you, and evaluate you more.  While the end goal of the athletic recruiting process is to get a scholarship offer, what junior athletes are seeking most is the opportunity to be evaluated by college coaches.  Keep that in mind before trying to pressure any coaches into offering you a scholarship.

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