I’m a junior with little to no football recruiting interest. What do I do? 

If this is the case for you as an athlete, the first thing you need to ask yourself is do you really want to play college football? If you do decide to play in college, you must make the decision that you are doing it for yourself and not your dad, a friend, or family members. The amount of time that you spend in the sport is incredible so make sure that you are 100% focused on playing.

I am going to be honest with readers and say that if you are not receiving much interest at this point, it is going to be tough to be a Division I-A scholarship football player coming out of high school. While there are some exceptions obviously, it will not be an easy road. But this site also tries to help football recruits find smaller schools and that will be part of what you need to look at.

When writing this kind of article, it does seem that I always bring up this article up a resource that you need to check out is the five steps to a scholarship (CLICK HERE FOR THE ARTICLE). As mentioned in the first step, I think it is very important for you to put together a recruiting profile and go through the first three steps of that article.

Right now, I honestly don’t think it would be worth your time and money to put together a highlight video or a website. If you still have big aspirations, go right ahead, but I am not 100% sure that they will pay off in the end. That is just a warning as it is completely up to you obviously.

Once you finish putting together a recruiting profile, go through the next two steps as well (Find schools that match you and market yourself to the schools). I would talk about these steps more but since I already have written articles on each, make sure to check those out and follow the guidelines included.

While going through those three steps, I would also try to talk to your high school football coach and any other non bias experts to talk about what level you can play. You need to figure out what level your coach thinks that you can play at and speak with anyone else that may have a good clue for how good you have to be to play at certain college levels. Let me quickly note that I feel high school coaches feel that their players are normally better than they usually are.

If they say that they think you have a shot to play Division II, then the next step is to look into Division II football camps. If you look hard enough, there are also quality Division III and NAIA camps somewhere in your state that may be worth going to. I would look for the ones that have received the best reviews as far as player development. If it helps your recruiting that is great but you want the money to help you become a better football player.

The window is closing but you need to look into getting to as many free combines (Nike/Scout) as you can. These are a great opportunity to get a non bias opinion about your skills. Talk to the position coach that you worked with and try to get an honest opinion about what level he thinks that you can play. Hopefully you find a coach that will tell you the level that you can play.

I will stress this over and over because it just pains me to see people wasting their money but do not waste your time and finances on combines that cost money. These will not help you in the recruiting process and are a huge waste. The only thing that happens is that you are making those that run the camp some extra money.

Right now, the biggest things that you must do is get an accurate assessment of what level you can play at in college as well as do whatever you can to get your name out there. Getting that assessment is hard because few people actually know what it takes to play at different college levels. I’ve been around the recruiting game for over a decade and sometimes I can’t even tell with athletes.

And as far as getting your name out there, that is what the three step process mentioned above is about. You are not currently on the radar for college coaches so you need to do what you can to get them to notice you. That may include emails, calls, and attending their camp to do it but that must be a priority for you.

If you don’t have time to do it or there are questions in your head about it, college football may not be the thing for you. I would advice looking deep into your heart and figuring out if it is something you want to spend a great deal of time doing for the next four or five years.
 

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