What college coach should I send my recruiting profile to?

For those that have read The Five Steps to a Scholarship Offer, it is obvious how important is for an athlete to market themselves.  As I have said over and over again, unless you are a top 100 talent in the country, you will likely need to do some work to really put yourself in front of college coaches.  And once they are aware of you, that is when you can get the ball rolling.

If you do go through the first two steps of that article, then you will move onto marketing yourself (Or your child) to the college coaches.  But many wonder which coach should I be sending that information to?  Because there is no clear cut question, I am going to take a look at the both football recruiting and basketball recruiting when trying to answer this question.

At the Division I level, many times there are secretaries that filter the emails for the coaching staff.  When finding the staff directory, many colleges have all of their emails listed as that of the secretary.  When looking at the email, it is pretty obvious to tell if that is the email of the coach or that of someone else.  If it a secretary, your first move should be to request contact information for the actual coach.

The first thing that I am going to mention is that you should not send recruiting profile to the head coach at the school.  It doesn’t matter what the circumstance is.  The head coach is extremely busy with so many other things that they likely do not have the time to look into your recruiting profile.  You are wasting your time trying to track down the email and the time of the coach by actually sending it him.  This applies to both football and basketball.

For both sports, the first thing you should do is go to the page that lists the coaches.  If you have time, look at each profile and see if there is something that you have in common with the coach.  For example, if the coach played in your conference or your area many years ago, that may be the guy you want to send it to.

If there are not common bonds between you and the coaching staff, here is where the sports will differ.  The first place coach you should look into for football is the recruiting coordinator.  At the Division I and II levels, most coaching staffs have an official recruiting coordinator.  Their job title is exactly what they do.  This coach coordinates the recruiting process with visits, offers, evaluation, calls, and just about everything that you can imagine.

That is the first coach you should look into.  For basketball, my advice would be to find a coach that is is lower on depth chart.  While some first assistants are head recruiters, the majority of time the coaches that are spending the most time recruiting are the younger ones.  They are usually the second or third assistant and their main focus is recruiting.  If you can look at the bios, figure out which one is an official assistant coach and looks the youngest.

Switching gears back to football, the assistant coaches that recruit usually have areas throughout the country.  For example, a school like Nebraska may have a coach that recruits in-state, another that goes to California, another who recruits Texas, and other coaches do the work in between.  If you are aware of the coach that recruits in your area, then he should be the one that is receiving your profile.  If you are unsure, what you should do is email the secretary and kindly ask which coach recruits in your area.

One major thing that a coaching staff will not appreciate is sending a profile to every coach on staff.  Just because you have their email addresses does not mean you need to send every coach a copy.  Sending the information to more than one coach is more than sufficient.  You are trying to get your name out there, not annoy them.

My guess is that college coaches will respond back if they have received the information and processed it.  They should at least say thank you and give you camp information.  Once that is done, then hopefully they will start recruiting you.  If the coaches do not send any information back, you need to be patient.

I would give the coaches up to two weeks to email back.  You have to realize how busy that they are and they could also be out of town for vacation or recruiting.  Anything can get in the way from email that patience is key here.  After two weeks, you can either email the coach again or find another coach who may be more receptive.  I personally would lean towards finding another coach but that would be your call.

Again, check out The Five Steps to a Scholarship Offer for more!

 

 

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