I’m a junior with football scholarship offers. What do I do?

If you are one of the few football players in the country with scholarship offers in hand (By that I mean a written offer, not a verbal scholarship), you still need to consider yourself a very lucky person. The percentage of scholarship football players is less than 2% when Signing Day comes around. The fact that you have early offers says something about your ability.

But like most athletes, you would love to see that offer list grow even more so that you will be given more opportunities as where you would like to attend college. Scholarship offers breed other offers and the fact that you have them this early will help you at camps and combines. The coaches and experts will take a longer look at you because you have a scholarship offer behind your name.

In regards to those camps, you need to make a decision as to which ones you want to go to. Now is a great time to try and figure out where you want to go during the June camp period. The biggest thing that you must figure out is if you want to learn more about the schools that offered you or try to impress other college coaches at schools that are just recruiting you and have yet to offer.

The reason that you go to the schools that have offered is to get to learn more about the coaches. You would get a chance first hand to see how they coach. While some may not be as intense as they normally are, you should be able to get a good feel for how they coach. There will also be down time when you get a chance to learn more about the coach himself and what type of person that they are. The coaches will definitely use this time to build a bond that can help them later on in the recruiting process.

The good news about attending other college camps is that with offers in your back pocket, the school will take a much longer look at you. Without those, they may evaluate for a brief time and then move on. An offer makes them think about why another school wants you that bad. And if you are at their camp, it does show that you are interested enough in their school to drive their and pay for camp. This is a big benefit for both parties involved.

You also may make the decision to save the money and not attend camps. If that is the case, then you should use part of your summer to take college visits. Although you won’t get a chance to see the coaches getting after it on the field, you will be able to build a relationship in person with the coaching staffs. If you have the time and resources, it may be worth going to the schools that have offered and a few that have not. When at the schools that are still evaluating you, ask them what you can improve on and what you need to do to a get a scholarship from their school. Yes, these are not easy questions to ask but definitely worth it in the long run.

If you are unhappy with the current crop of schools that have offered and are recruiting you, it may be time to go back to a few important steps in the recruiting process. As I wrote about in the five steps to a scholarship (CLICK HERE FOR THE ARTICLE), you need to start searching for schools that match you (Step #2) and also market yourself to those schools (Step #3). If you haven’t already done so, you may also want to build a recruiting profile as well (Step #1).

These steps give you an opportunity to be the one contacting the coaches. While a school like USC may not show that much interest, having a Division I offer already does help open some eyes when you contact them. Tell them why you are interested in their school and that should help matters. You may also take the time and contact your dream school that you grew up watching. It may not lead to anything but you just never know.

When looking at your scholarship offers, if you basically know where you want to go to college and that school has extended a scholarship, you might as well verbally commit. Make sure that you are sold on the school as well as your family because you should not be committing and changing your mind later on. You can now spend part of your time helping to recruit for that program.

Again, you are in a great situation where you can pick and choose what you do. Take your time during the process and research all the schools that are recruiting you. That should help you break things down and get closer to that eventual college decision.

 

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